Education the path to more support for shark conservation

A whitetip reef shark. Photo courtesy NOAA.

A whitetip reef shark. Photo courtesy NOAA.

Study says recreational anglers need more and better info

Staff Report

A little education could go a long way toward spurring more support for shark conservation among recreational anglers, said a team of scientists who recently questioned anglers on the subject.

The study, led by University of Miami scientists, showed that recreational anglers were more supportive of shark management and conservation if they had prior knowledge of shark conservation. Continue reading

Morning photo: Cotignac

Provence light

A short flashback to a day trip to Cotignac, one of the classic hill towns in the Provence region of France, with cliff dwellings dating back to the 16th and 17th centuries. There was a quietness in the air in late November when we stopped by, with not a tourist (except us) in sight. It’s the first time I’ve visited the area in the autumn, and the light was just as magical as any other time of year.

Can Paris climate deal cap global warming at 2 degrees?


Eight record-warm months and counting in 2015 so far.

Greenhouse gas cuts must start right away and continue after 2030

Staff Report

The deal currently on the table at the upcoming Paris climate talks would be a big step toward limiting global warming at or near 2 degrees Celsius — deemed a critical environmental threshold by climate scientists.

But reaching that target will require additional commitments to cut greenhouse gas emissions beyond 2025, according to a new study that took a close look at the pledges made by individual countries to reduce their emissions. Continue reading

How does pharmaceutical pollution affect fish?

The Snake River courses through a boulder field near Keystone. Colorado.

Traces of medicine in freshwater streams have a wide range of impacts on fish.

New study documents wide range of impacts

Staff Report

Fish exposed to remnant traces of medicines, including pain relievers, muscle relaxants and antidepressants, grow more slowly and have a harder time escaping predators, say scientists who carefully studied the effects of pharmaceutical pollutants.

The study analyzed effects from nine individual pharmaceuticals, as well as varying mixtures of these chemicals, on both juvenile and adult fathead minnows. It was conducted by the Aquatic Toxicology Laboratory at St. Cloud State University and the U.S. Geological Survey, with the findings published in a special edition of Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry. Continue reading

2015 nearly sure to be warmest year on record

‘We have the knowledge and the tools to act. We have a choice. Future generations will not’


Global meltdown? @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

A new report released just days before the start of the Paris climate talks makes it clear why there is so much interest in reaching an agreement to cap global warming. The World Meteorological Organization said it’s all but certain that 2015 will be the hottest year on record.

The global average temperature for the year will probably cross a symbolic threshold, reaching 1.0 degrees Celsius above the pre-industrial era, capping a five-year span that is also the warmest on record, the WMO said, blaming a strong El Niño and human-induced global warming. Read more of the WMO information here. Continue reading

More proof there is no global warming ‘pause’


There is no ‘pause’ in global warming.

‘Why has so much research been framed around the concept of a ‘hiatus’ when it does not exist?’

Staff Report

After a couple of years of furor over the faux global warming pause, scientists with the University of Bristol (UK) say they have yet more evidence there was never any slowdown in the steady rise of temperatures worldwide. Continue reading

Study says 1980s saw major climate shift

Golden toads were discovered in Coata Rica in 1966. None have been seen since 1989, despite intensive surveys. They are presumed extinct. PHOTO COURTESY U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE.

Golden toads were discovered in Costa Rica in 1966. None have been seen since 1989, despite intensive surveys. They are presumed extinct. Photo courtesy U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

‘The 1980s regime shift may be the beginning of the acceleration of the warming shown by the IPCC …’

Staff Report

By taking a big-picture look at the Earth’s various systems over time, researchers say they’ve been able to pinpoint a major global climate shift starting in the late 1980s, triggered by anthropogenic warming and the 1982 El Chichón volcanic eruption in Mexico.

The new study, published recently in Global Change Biology, documents a range of associated events caused by the shift, including a 60 percent increase in winter river flow into the Baltic Sea and a 400 percent increase in the average duration of wildfires in the Western United States. Continue reading


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